Eurocarve on a Snowboard

TRICK TIP

Whats holding back your frontside spins

Frontside spins are typically the first port of call for aspiring freestyle riders. Who doesn't want to spin on a board. It's part of the fun. The only problem being it's can actually quite tough to do properly. We can all throw around a 180 and sometimes land, but if you want to progress beyond a crappy 180 and possible to 360's, you'll certainly need to iron out some of the fundamental issues that often start from day one of learning to snowboard. In this article I'll highlight those common issues and look to figure out some ways to help you throw down those frontside spins like its nothing.  

Riding Posture Issues

A common rider issue is twisting the body to face down the slope. It's a typical position that we adopt so we can more easily look down the slope. The problem is this creates an imbalance in your weight distribution. The more you open your shoulders to more weight shifts to the back leg.

That in itself isn't a big issue, but it can result in making turning more difficult. The rider will then resort to using their front shoulder more to initiate board rotation. It gets the job done, but when it comes to trying to spin riders often use the shoulders to initiate the rotation like a turn which causes a lot of issues.

In terms of turning, yes we can use a little of our upper body to preempt a turn, but it shouldn't be the primary initiator. Turning (steering) should be come from whats closest to the snow, i.e the board with your feet, ankles and knees twisting and manipulating the board. That way you can relax your upper body and only use it when it adds value to your riding, i.e freestyle.

https://maverixsnow.medium.com/is-your-back-arm-killing-your-freestyle-snowboarding-dbdf7a4d4bbd

https://maverixsnow.medium.com/dont-be-premature-on-your-snowboard-frontside-180-s-b2579cd06ec

Back Arm Posture Issues

A common riding issue is twisting their body to face down the slope. It's a typical position that we adopt so we can more easily look down the slope. The problem is this creates an imbalance in your weight distribution. The more you open your shoulders to moe weight shifts to the back leg. 

That in itself isn't a big issue, but it can result in making turning more difficult. The rider will then resort to using their shoulders more to initiate board rotation. It gets the job done, but when it comes to trying to spin they often use the shoulders to initiate the rotation like a turn which causes a lot of issues. 

In terms of turning, yes we can use a little of our upper body to preempt a turn, but it shouldn't be the primary initiator. Turning (steering) should be come from whats closest to the snow, i.e the board with your feet, ankles and knees twisting and manipulating the board. That way you can relax your upper body and only use it when it adds value to your riding, i.e freestyle.

Les Deux Alpes Snow Park

How does this Impact Freestyle



For some this trick comes naturally, but for many, including myself this is one of the toughest rail tricks to get on lock. Whereas with a B/S board or Noseslide your posture and level of tweak can make it look weird or wicked I find almost any posture works for this trick (check the pics). It just flows. The movement pattern is very similar to a Method 🧐

If you can bust out one of these on a decent side hit rail you’ll be in with the locals. Your street cred will be cemented even if you have nothing else in the bank.

For the feeling - Backside 180

When you get a solid backside 180 it just floats and feels effortless. On a big jump time almost stands still and you do next to nothing to achieve the rotation. For a UK rider they can also feel great even on small jumps. Well worth spending some time to get them floaty with some extra teaks or grabs to stamp your own personality on it.

It will also move you out of the frontside 180 crew. Pro’s often talk about this being one of their favourite tricks. Work on your switch riding and try to avoid the classic separation that kills the rotation if you keep looking downhill when you leave the kicker. Check my previous instagram posts for a full guide to Backside 180’s.

For the people - Backflip

OK, hear me out on this one. As a coach you could do with something a bit flashy for your clients. As a rider you’ll want something to impress your mates. In essence a backflip is not that technical a move. Yet I’ve certainly seen and experienced numerous heavy slams through flipping.

The weird thing is I’ve seen guys who can hardly hit a rail, yet can throw down flips. For me I need the landing percentage to be high if I decide to flip. There is too much on the line for just having a go, and my consistency for backflips is low.

Before lockdown I was working with a coach in a parkour gym to train for backflips, so my awareness in the air and my body is stronger. That way I stand a better chance of surviving and landing a backflip. That’s certainly what I recommend for guys who want it. 

I hope that gives you a heads up on the basics of avalanches. If you want to learn more about off piste safety check out some of my other articles.

Follow Us

FOLLOW OUR ADVENTURES

Join our Community

SIGN UP TO BE INFORMED & INSPIRED

© Copyright 2008-2021 Maverix Snow Ltd - All Rights Reserved - Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Sitemap